The language racers speak can be downright confusing at times. Flat Tail, Pan Handle, Proto, Streamliner, Mite, etc. But now,  the non-tether racing literate have a handy-dandy guide to phrases bandied about at your average AMRCA  event. Yes, now you too can hang with old dudes who can't get enough methanol  in their diets! And lets not forget the young lady that helped put this all together. Our very own, McCOY Scooter Girl.
  • AMRCA - American Miniature Race Car Association.
  • AMRCC ~ Antique Miniature Race Car Collectors. This organization, currently active, caters to collectors of tether and rail racers of all sizes and shapes. Address: 3411 Woodward Road, 1·luntingdon Valley, Pa. 19006-4053.
  • Big cars ~ Miniature race cars powered by approximately .60 cubic inch (10cC) engines.
  • BMCC — British Model Car Club, later became Model Car Association.
  • Flat tail — A race car body configuration prevalent in 1920s and 1930s midgets and sprint cars. Refers to cars without a faired-in headrest.
  • IMRCA — International Model Race Car Association.
  • MECA —— Model Engine Collectors Association. A club for collectors of model engines ot all sizes I used in model aircrait, cars, and boats. Has a large international membership. Address: 3007 Travis, West Lake, La. 70669.
  • Mite ~ ln general, those miniature race cars of smaller engine displacement and overall dimension. ln the opinion of some collectors, however, only those mass—producecl cars of the postwar period: Thimble Drome, O & R, etc. I
  • MRCA —— Model Race Car Association. Includes many chapters, such as Western States Model Race Car Association (WSMRCA).
  • Pan (or belly pan) — One—piece cast lower body half or chassis.
  • Pan handle —— A single point mount for cables attached to the center of mass on postwar tether I cars.
  • Proto (or prototype) cars — Cars built to resemble full-size race cars or "the real thing," and with a cockpit. As distinguished from streainliners. I
  • Rail cars — Miniature race cars that ran on tracks guided by dual ball bearing pivot points on front I and rear axles. These ran on either side of a purpose-built L—shaped rail.
  • Streamliners — A class of car, typically the fastest, that allowed aerodynamic shape to dominate i scale appearance. Early models were cabin cars with enclosed cockpits, which loosely resembled the land speed record cars of the era. Later strearnliners were of a teardrop shape. The most ott- I seen teardrop examples include the Matthews V-Car and the Duro—Matic streamliner.
  • Tether cars — Miniature race cars that ran on circular tracks and were tethered to a center pivot by a high—strength small diameter cable.